Tag Archives: Recipe

Authentic Homemade Hot Chocolate

28 Nov

Written and photographed by Rebekah Peppler

Rich, creamy and impossibly decadent, hot chocolate has lived up to its name as a drink fit for gods, warriors and kings for millennium. That is until America (okay, and Britain) got its sticky fingers all over it.While I grew up sipping my fair share instant hot cocoa made popular by brands like Nestlé and Swiss Miss, the distinction between hot cocoa and hot chocolate is much more than one word. It’s a varied history, rife with centuries of sweet, cocoa bean-laden roots.

Making its entrée into civilization around 1000 B.C., cocoa was first harvested by the Olmecs and made into a liquid by their better-known successors the Mayans, who then shared it with the Aztecs. The Aztecs, prodigious people as they were, bestowed it with the title Theobroma or “food of the gods”, spiced it with chili powder, honey and vanilla and served it lukewarm to give strength to their warriors.

When the conquistadors returned to Spain with their plunder of cocoa they replaced the Aztec’s spices with sugar, the warriors with the upper class, served it hot and kept it a secret for nearly a century. After word got out about the potation, hot chocolate spread rapidly amidst the high societies of Europe, picking up a proclivity for milk in Britain and maintaining its elitist status. Continue reading

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Project 5: Korean-Style Steak and Eggs

28 Nov

Recipe by Zach Field

The French Culinary Institute’s Level 5 project is a taste what (F.C.I) students are made of. This project is for students in the classic culinary arts program (1 level away from graduation).

Eat Life’s Project 5 showcases select students so everyone can get a glimpse of the talent behind F.C.I’s kitchen doors. Introducing Zach Field’s  level 5 recipe from his project, A Day with Andy and Eggs.

 


Yield: Makes 8 servings

Steak:
1/2 cup mirin (sweet Japanese rice wine)*
4 tablespoons finely grated cored peeled Granny Smith
apple Continue reading

Project 5: Sweet Potato Cake with Lime Mousse & Purple Corn Sauce

28 Nov

Written by Cameron Slaugh

The French Culinary Institute’s Level 5 project is a taste what (F.C.I) students are made of. This project is for students in the classic culinary arts program (1 level away from graduation).

Eat Life’s Project 5 showcases select students so everyone can get a glimpse of the talent behind F.C.I’s kitchen doors. Introducing Cameron Slaugh’s level 5 recipe from his project, The Potato.

Sweet Potato Cake
1/2 pinch saffron
1 tablespoon hot water
1-1/2 cups mashed sweet potatoes
3 whole eggs
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup unsalted melted butter
1/2 cup canola oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt

Lime – Mascarpone Mousse
3/4 cup mascarpone cheese
1-3/4 cups heavy cream
3 egg whites
1/4 cup sugar
2 limes – more if needed Continue reading

Hummus, Too Good for Hannibal

28 Nov

Written by Erin Merhar

Amidst 36°F weather at the end of March, I write this with wishful thoughts of blooming daffodils, jacket-less Sundays, Prosecco al fresco and picnics in the park… Spring is around the corner and with its sunshine it brings a gamut of refreshing ingredients.

Swap Jerusalem artichokes and for a buttery, tender baby artichoke. Go green with spring peas and asparagus. And as you open your closets for spring cleaning, pod a fava bean and explore the nutty, buttery tenderness of an old world tradition.

Continue reading

Tulip Petals Taste Like Cucumbers

28 Nov
Written by Rebekah Peppler
Edible Flowers, Eat Life FCI

(2 Flower recipes included)
Ah… to add the taste of sweet, spice, mint, floral or citrus to a meal. To sprinkle flavor on top of a finished dish, tweaking the final result, enhancing that last dimension of texture, color and taste is divine. No, this isn’t a fanciful description of the virtues of freshly-cracked black pepper, fragrant Herbes de Provence or robust ground cumin. In fact, there’s no need to reach for the spice rack at all; simply reach for the flower pot Edible flowers of all varieties can be found in many innovative kitchens across the country, adding a touch of elegance and a surprising balance of texture, fragrance, color and flavor to many dishes, both sweet and savory. Continue reading

Project 5: Duck Confit & Duck Fat Rice Cakes with Shiitake Mushrooms

28 Nov

Recipe by Susan Oak

The French Culinary Institute’s Level 5 project is a taste what (F.C.I) students are made of. This project is for students in the classic culinary arts program (1 level away from graduation).

Eat Life’s Project 5 showcases select students so everyone can get a glimpse of the talent behind F.C.I’s kitchen doors. Introducing Susan Oak’s Level 5 recipe from her project, Fat.

Duck Confit and Duck Fat Rice Recipe, The French Culinary Institute's Level 5 project - Eat Life FCI

DUCK FAT: Duck Confit and Duck Fat Rice Cakes shitake mushrooms and scallions

Fat Fact: Duck fat fries are becoming an increasingly common menu offering. Here, a take on the same, with duck fat rice cakes. Pair with a medium-bodied dry red with some acidity to cut the richness of the dish, such as the Ridge, Geyserville 2006 from Alexander Valley. Continue reading

Project 5: Sesame Oil – Pork Belly and Cucumber Salad, Sesame Garlic Confit

28 Nov

Recipe by Susan Oak

The French Culinary Institute’s Level 5 project is a taste what (F.C.I) students are made of. This project is for students in the classic culinary arts program (1 level away from graduation).

Eat Life’s Project 5 showcases select students so everyone can get a glimpse of the talent behind F.C.I’s kitchen doors. Introducing Susan Oak’s Level 5 recipe from her project, Fat.

Pork Belly and cucumber salad recipe,The French Culinary Institute's Level 5 project - Eat Life FCI

SESAME OIL: Pork Belly and Cucumber Salad, sesame garlic confit

Fat Fact: Sesame oil is commonly used in Korean cuisine. This dish is a take on a very common Korean meal of grilled pork belly, often cooked at the table and dipped into a simple sauce of sesame oil, salt and pepper. Try it with a traditional Korean rice wine, like Baekseju. Continue reading